Larry Mcdermid

The Diagnosis Of Heel Spur

Inferior Calcaneal Spur


Overview


A heel spur is a bony projection on the sole (bottom) of the heel bone. This condition may accompany or result from severe cases of inflammation to the structure called plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is a fibrous band of connective tissue on the sole of the foot, extending from the heel to the toes. Heel spurs are a common foot problem resulting from excess bone growth on the heel bone. The bone growth is usually located on the underside of the heel bone, and may extend forward toward the toes. A painful tear in the plantar fascia between the toes and heel can produce a heel spur and/or inflammation of the plantar fascia. Because this condition is often correlated to a decrease in the arch of the foot, it is more prevalent after the ages of six to eight years, when the arch is fully developed.


Causes


Heel spurs under the sole of the foot (plantar area) are associated with inflammation of the plantar fascia (fasciitis), the "bowstring-like" tissue stretching underneath the sole that attaches at the heel. Plantar heel spurs cause localized tenderness and pain made worse when stepping down on the heel. Heel spurs and plantar fasciitis can occur alone or be related to underlying diseases that cause arthritis (inflammation of the joints), such as reactive arthritis (formerly called Reiter's disease), ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. It is important to note that heel spurs may cause no symptoms at all and may be incidentally discovered during X-ray exams taken for other purposes.


Calcaneal Spur


Symptoms


If your body has created calcium build-ups in an effort to support your plantar fascia ligament, each time you step down with your foot, the heel spur is being driven into the soft, fatty tissue which lines the bottom of your heel. Heel spur sufferers experience stabbing sensations because the hard protrusion is literally being jabbed into the heel pad. If left untreated, Plantar Fasciitis and heel spurs can erode the fatty pad of the heel and cause permanent damage to the foot. Fortunately, most cases can be resolved without medications or surgeries.


Diagnosis


Most patients who are suffering with heel spurs can see them with an X-ray scan. They are normally hooked and extend into the heel. Some people who have heel spur may not even have noticeable symptoms, although could still be able to see a spur in an X-ray scan.


Non Surgical Treatment


Heel spurs and plantar fascitis are usually controlled with conservative treatment. Early intervention includes stretching the calf muscles while avoiding re-injuring the plantar fascia. Decreasing or changing activities, losing excess weight, and improving the proper fitting of shoes are all important measures to decrease this common source of foot pain. Modification of footwear includes shoes with a raised heel and better arch support. Shoe orthotics recommended by a healthcare professional are often very helpful in conjunction with exercises to increase strength of the foot muscles and arch. The orthotic prevents excess pronation and lengthening of the plantar fascia and continued tearing of this structure. To aid in this reduction of inflammation, applying ice for 10-15 minutes after activities and use of anti-inflammatory medication can be helpful. Physical therapy can be beneficial with the use of heat modalities, such as ultrasound that creates a deep heat and reduces inflammation. If the pain caused by inflammation is constant, keeping the foot raised above the heart and/or compressed by wrapping with an ace bandage will help. Corticosteroid injections are also frequently used to reduce pain and inflammation. Taping can help speed the healing process by protecting the fascia from reinjury, especially during stretching and walking.


Surgical Treatment


In some cases, heel spurs are removed by surgery after an X-ray. While the surgery is typically effective, it?s a timely and expensive procedure. Even after surgery, heel spurs can re-form if the patient continues the lifestyle that led to the problem. These reasons are why most people who develop painful heel spurs begin looking for natural remedies for joint and bone pain. Surgery isn?t required to cure a heel spur. In fact, more than 90 percent of people get better with nonsurgical treatments. If nonsurgical methods fail to treat symptoms of heel spurs after 12 months, surgery may be necessary to alleviate pain and restore mobility.


Prevention


Use orthotic inserts. You can purchase orthotics over the counter, or you can have orthotics specially fitted by your podiatrist. Try 1 of these options. Heel cups. These inserts will help to align the bones in your foot and to cushion your heel. Check your skin for blisters when you first start using heel cups. Also, your feet may sweat more with a heel cup, so change your socks and shoes often. Insoles. While you can pick up generic insoles at a drugstore, you may have more luck if you go to a store that sells athletic shoes. Push on the arch to make sure that it doesn't collapse. If your insoles help but could use a little work, you can take them to a podiatrist to get them customized. Custom orthotics. A podiatrist can make a cast of your foot and provide you with custom-made orthotics. These may be more expensive, but they are made of materials specifically designed for your needs, and they can last up to 5 years if your podiatrist refurbishes them every 1 or 2 years. To find a podiatrist near you, look at the Web page for the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine. Dynamic Insoles. Lack of elasticity in plantar fascia in the foot is for most people the real problem. If there is poor elasticity in the lengthwise tendons in the foot (plantar fascia) in relation to a person's general condition, only a small additional strain is required for the pull on the tendons to cause damage to the tissues connecting the tendons to the heel bone. This will generate an inflamed condition called Plantar Fasciitis.
Top of page

Comments

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/04/04(火) 20:00:30 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/04/11(火) 05:54:48 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/04/26(水) 23:18:51 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/08/31(木) 20:21:07 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/09/01(金) 13:57:42 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/09/28(木) 21:37:01 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/10/19(木) 09:47:41 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2017/11/14(火) 19:21:55 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2018/07/31(火) 15:42:33 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Comment is pending approval.

Comment is pending blog author's approval.

  • 2018/08/17(金) 04:16:46 |
  • |
  • #
  • [Edit]

Post a comment


Only the blog author may view the comment.

Trackbacks

Trackbacks URL
http://larrymcdermid.blog.fc2.com/tb.php/9-862beb34
Use trackback on this entry.
Top of page

Profile

Larry Mcdermid

Author:Larry Mcdermid
Welcome to FC2!

Latest journals

Latest comments

Monthly archive

Category

Category: None (7)
Adult Aquired Flat Foot (1)
Bunions (1)

Search form

Display RSS link.

Link

add link

Friend request form

Want to be friends with this user.